Little bird, big voice (small and noisy!)

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Wren, River Idle (last spring)

Well, what can we say?  I’m sure everyone has heard and seen the beautiful little wren.  In the 60s and 70s my grandad and dad would always say, “Look, Lee, a jenny wren!”.  I still often call them a jenny wren.  Anyway, everywhere Alison and I venture on our birding outings, we hear the loud sharp call of the wren.  We often see them darting around bushes, banks and hedges, and never get tired of this little British icon.

The wren is about 10 cm in stature, and almost looks like a small mouse.  We often see it in its crouched position giving out a loud, boisterous musical song.

Wren kings park.JPG

Wren, King’s Park

Its body is of a dark brown, barred, rich plumage, with a dark pointed down curved beak and pale eye stripe.  It is really fast in flight, and can often be seen bobbing about on or close to the ground.  The nest can be made of a domed grassy structure of even ferns with a little entrance hole on the side.  Sometimes they will build more than one nest, but only breed in one.  The eggs are tiny, white with little orangey specks.

wren 3 kings park.JPG

Wren, King’s Park

A very widespread and common little bird, its habitat is mainly well vegetated areas of all kinds of woodland and heaths almost everywhere.  However, numbers can plummet in severe winters.

Our first picture of the wren is our favourite: right place right time again, on top of a budding apple tree near the River Idle in spring.  The others are from King’s Park, where they are often seen bobbing about in the undergrowth.

We know it’s getting wintry and nights are drawing in, but the sight and sound of this gorgeous little bird cheers us up every time we see and hear them.  The wren is also one of the few birds which continue to sing during the winter months, keeping us company throughout the cold weather.  It’s amazing to hear such a big sound from such a little bird!

wren-2-kings-park

Wren, King’s Park

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